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SCENE: GREG'S MONOLOGUE

GREG
When I was a little kid I never realized how poor we were. I grew up in Birmingham, Alabama, and we lived in this really tiny apartment. Of course, when you’re growing up you don’t realize how small it is but I’ve gone back and looked in the window and I can’t believe it. It wasn’t even a one bedroom, it was more like a studio with an alcove. And, of course, my mom let me stay in the alcove. My mom’s a really incredible person. You know how you always hear about these people with these really awful coming out stories. Mine wasn’t like that. My mom was really cool about it. I never met my father. And I sometimes wonder if it would have been harder to come out if I’d grown up with both parents in the house, but my mom is just so open. So aside from not having money we were pretty happy. But unfortunately when I got in the seventh grade all the status stuff started to happen. Things like brand name sneakers and taking your lunch to school instead of buying it and allowances. Other kids would talk about buying things with their allowances and I would get so jealous. I never had money in my pocket. Never. And around my sophomore year in high school I just couldn’t take it anymore and so I got a job. I went down to the local Pizza Hut and I filled out an application and they hired me on the spot and two weeks later I got my first paycheck. It was for 56 dollars and 16 cents. And I’ll never forget cashing it. I was so worried they weren’t gonna give me the money, but they did and I walked out of the bank and, this is really embarrassing, but when I got outside I started crying. I was just so happy, I couldn’t believe it. I felt so rich. It was one of the greatest days of my life. So how did I end up here? How does a pizza boy from Birmingham, Alabama end up dancing in a g-string in Times Square. Well first of all this did not happen over night. I didn’t just wake up one morning and start dancing at places like the Gaiety. I always knew I was gay. I didn’t know what it meant but I knew I liked men. And there was this older guy who worked at the Pizza Hut with me and he was always making sexual jokes. And one night we were closing up and we started joking around and he asked me if I’d ever done anything with a guy and one thing lead to another and we wound up at his place. And it was great because even though the sex wasn’t that good he had all these books and newspapers about being gay and he really showed me that it was no big deal. So anyway he took me to all the gay bars in town, I think there were like three or something, and I was only 15 at the time but they still let me in. And it was amazing, I met all these crazy people and had all this wild sex. And because I was so young everybody wanted to do me and I never had to pay for drinks. And some of the older guys even offered to give me money, you know for sex. And I started to figure out very quickly that if your smart and your good-looking and you play your cards right you can get away with anything. So I went home with some of these men, you know for money, and I made more in one night than I’d make in a whole weekend at Pizza Hut. And it was cash and it was tax free and it felt so good. At first I was pretty selfish with the money, I’d buy shoes and records and concert tickets. But after awhile I started to help out my mom. I’d pay half the rent, I’d buy groceries, I got us HBO. Having nice clothes was cool and all, but giving money to my mom, that was the best. It really changed me. I figured out what my mom made, and I looked back on our lives before I had a job and I have no idea how we got by. But the problem with making money is that it makes you greedy. I wanted more, but I’d pretty much tapped out the local market. I mean there’s only so much you can make hustling in Birmingham. And I had this friend who’d moved to Atlanta, and he was always telling tell me how exciting it was and he was always trying to get me to come over for a weekend. And he sent me a copy of their gay paper and there was an ad for an amateur strip contest. First prize 500 bucks. Now I was making money, but I wasn’t making that kind of money. And I loved to dance but I’d never gotten paid for it, so I signed up. And I went up for the weekend and I won. And my whole life changed. I met all these people who wanted to know where I was from. I got all these phone numbers. I was like a little celebrity. And everybody said, "What are you doing in Birmingham? How could you live in Birmingham?" And so I started to go to Atlanta all the time. I placed an ad in the back of one of their gay rags with a little picture of my chest and whenever I came to town I was busy the whole weekend. My mom couldn’t figure out why I was so obsessed with Atlanta, but she was happy that I was independent. And I guess it’s like this with every business, I don’t know I’ve only been in this one, but once you get in, it’s very hard to get out because I became very good at my job. And the better I got, the more money I made. And I experienced career advancement. You see there’s like a circuit. You hear about clubs from other guys passing through town. You have a falling out with the boss. If you’re good or if you’re reliable and other places hear about you the managers might come and try to lure you away, especially if you’re reliable. See a lot of the guys here, and you did not hear this from me, a lotta guys that work in this business are really flakey. A lot of the guys are on drugs. I don’t do ‘em, I never have. And I’m not standing up here trying to be the go-go boy spokesperson, but a lot of the guys are really fucked up. That’s why the managers like me, because I always come in when I say I’ll come in and I do my job and then go home. I try to be very professional. Don’t get me wrong, a lot of the guys are professional, but a lot of them are really fucked up, too. So anyway, a lot of the people all know each other: the owners, the managers, the dancers. It’s all very connected. And that’s how I ended up in New York. I worked my way up the corporate ladder and here I am, The Big Apple. The bigger the city, the more money you make. And you make the real money when you combine the two: the dancing and the hustling. It’s a perfect combination because you meet so many people. I’ve danced in some clubs where there were like over 2000 guys and you’re up on this pedestal and they’re all watching you and putting dollars in your g-string and you get all these phone numbers. Dancing is like a commercial for hustling. It’s kind of like porn. Nobody makes all their money from pornos, you make it from hustling with the people who see you in the movies. And it’s the same with dancing. I danced at this one club in Canada where they actually have these little rooms so if someone wants a private show you just go off into the little room, do your thing, and ten minutes later you’re back on the floor. It’s very convenient. Some dancers don’t like the sex and some hustlers don’t like to dance, but I like it all. That’s why New York is so good for me. It’s the Big Apple, everything’s here including my mom. I brought her out two years ago and she loves it. She loves Broadway, she loves Central Park. We went down one morning and she stood outside the Today Show and Al Roker actually interviewed her. He said, "Where you from?" And she said, "Well I was from Birmingham, Alabama, but my son moved us up here so now I’m a New Yorker." And he said, "What does your son do?" And she said, "He dances on Broadway."

 

   
       
         
 

 

SCENE: STEVENS’ FIRST CUSTOMER

Steven is in booth 2. Shane enters booth.

SHANE
You know you’re really hot.

STEVEN
Thank you.

(He gives him money)

SHANE
I bet guys tell you that all the time.

STEVEN
What?

SHANE
How fucking hot you are.

STEVEN
Sometimes.

SHANE
You have a really pretty mouth.

STEVEN
Thank you.

SHANE
I’d like to fuck it. Would you like that? Would you? Would you like to be my pussy boy? Say it.

STEVEN
Say what?

SHANE
"I wanna be your pussy boy."

STEVEN
You want me to say that?

SHANE
Yeah, say, "I wanna be your pussy boy."

STEVEN
I wanna be your pussy boy.

SHANE
Say it louder.

STEVEN
I wanna be your pussy boy.

SHANE
I know you do. You’re a fucking faggot, aren’t you? I bet you got a tight pussy-hole. Do you?

(Steven nods "Yes")

SHANE (cont’d)
Do you really?

(He nods "Yes")

SHANE (cont’d)
Don’t lie to me, cocksucker. Are you lying?
Steven shakes his head "No." He gives him money again.

SHANE (cont’d)
So, what’s your name?

STEVEN
Steven.

SHANE
No, your real name.

STEVEN
It’s Steven.

SHANE
Nobody uses their real name here. Tell me your real name.

STEVEN
Jonathan?

(He gives him money a third time)

STEVEN (cont’d)
So, what’s your name?

SHANE
Why?

STEVEN
Just curious.

SHANE
It’s Shane.

STEVEN
Shane?

SHANE
Yeah. Shane. You have a problem with that?

STEVEN
No, it’s interesting.

SHANE
Shut up.(Beat)
So where are you from?

STEVEN
Oklahoma.

SHANE
The city or the state?

STEVEN
The city.

SHANE
You’re from Oklahoma City?

STEVEN
Yeah.

SHANE
No, you’re not.

STEVEN
I really am.

SHANE
Tell me where you’re really from.

STEVEN
I did.

SHANE
Do you want more of this?

(He waves the money at Brian)

SHANE (cont’d)
Then you tell me where you’re really from.

STEVEN
Minneapolis?

(He gives him money a fourth time)

SHANE
God, I wanna fuck you. Would you let me fuck you? Really? Open your mouth. Wider. Come here. Closer. All the way on the glass. Stick your tongue out. I think I’m in love with you.